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As you sow, so shall you reap :)


Well, I was happy to experience this in the last week…figuratively as well as literally !

The first experience was on Friday. For many many years now, my theatre organisation presents a historical play on the Parvati hill on the death anniversary of Nanasaheb Peshwe. 14th January 2011 is the 250th anniversary of the last battle of Panipat. So this year we presented a play based on this battle. TH wrote the play including the songs, composed the music and directed the play. The format was Song+narration--Scene--Song+narration--Scene. So SP SS and I were the three story-tellers. We sang some and narrated some, and then a scene was enacted by other actors and so on so forth.

I have had no training in singing whatsoever. However I listen to music a lot…and of all kinds. Over the years I have developed a good ear for music. Also, I sing a bit…you know the kind where you sing in a small gathering of close relatives…who will generally praise you no matter how you sing :)

Of course, I’ve been acknowledged as a decent singer by TH. Since TH is the one who has had formal training and also is a composer, it is to be taken as a compliment…also since he is quite a strict judge :)

So with trained singers like SP and SS, here I was, struggling for the first four days to get it. But eventually (= day five = two days before the show) I got it all right. And I sang on stage…with great confidence, without mistakes and with excellent story telling :)

Years and years of listening to a variety of music minutely (and practising songs and imitating singing styles secretly in front of the bathroom mirror) paid off :)

On Sunday A and I went to Aanandi Garden in the morning and were thrilled to bits to see neat rows of cute little plants come up from the seeds that we planted last Saturday :) Then we put in three more hours of work on a big patch and sowed more seeds so that we can have the pleasure of seeing these little ones grow when we go next Saturday.

Ohhh happiness !! To see your long-time wish come true !! To taste the fruits of your labour !! Pure bliss :)

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